Monthly Archives: May 2012

Copyright and Fair Use

Knowledge of copyright and fair use guidelines are an important element of eLearning. Many years ago I was asked to create and present a workshop on this topic by a client who said, tongue in cheek, “it seems people think ‘copy right’ means they have “the right to copy.”

Recently I was part of a discussion where I heard an echo of the most oft-repeated fallacy I’d heard many years ago: It’s OK to use someone else’s “stuff” if you’re not making money from it and/or if it’s only for classroom or internal use. Unfortunately, that’s not true. But you can find out what IS true with a little bit of research.

This is my favorite Copyright Website. You can find information on copyright and fair use and view examples of infringement in the movies, in music, and on the Web. (Interesting aside: Did you know George Harrison was sued for subconscious copyright infringement of “My Sweet Lord?” You can check it out here).

If you’re looking for more information, you may want to start with the U.S. Copyright Office.

As you read this information, you’ll see that, as with many things in life, nothing is clear cut. So, it’s often best to check with the originator of the work.

Copyright Blue Computer Key courtesy of Stuart Miles /FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

 

Thank you to our men and women in the military

torso of person in military uniform

Many of us have a variety of happy activities planned for this Memorial Day weekend. In my own family we are celebrating a marriage and planning visits with out-of-town family.

Thank you to our veterans, and to the men and women who continue to sacrifice so that we may go about our lives, enjoying carefree times like these.

Magnification Graphic Tip for PowerPoint®

Microsoft® PowerPoint® is used a lot in eLearning. Some people love it, others, well, not so much. But that’s not for today’s post :-). Since it IS used a lot, it’s certainly one of the elements of eLearning.

A while back I was reading a blog by the eLearning Coach (@elearning coach) where she provided a great tip on creating a magnification graphic. She merged two photos, a zoomed out photo that showed “the big picture” of a catheter, and a zoomed in one showing the catheter tip. She suggested the photo editing she’d done might be doable in PowerPoint®, so I decided to give it a try. Sure enough, it worked like a charm. Watch the video at the top of this post to see how it’s done.

Oh, and if you’re interested in her original post, you can find it here.

Note: Microsoft and PowerPoint are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

And…Even More on Character States in Storyline®

A couple days ago (5/18/12), I created a post that included a Screenr (instructional video) showing how to create custom states for photographic characters in Articulate® Storyline®, specifically the character named Rhonda. In this post, I show how to set up objects “offstage” that automatically trigger Rhonda’s changing emotional states during her phone conversation.

More on States for Characters in Storyline®

In a yesterday’s post (5/18/12), I showed how to easily change a character’s emotional state over time in Articulate® Storyline®. And, I promised to demonstrate how to trigger those states automatically. Haven’t had a chance to do that yet, but thought you might be interested in this Screenr (video tutorial) by David Anderson, Community Manager at Articulate® (@elearning).

David discusses how to use Storyline® states to manage a series of your own industry- or workplace-specific photos to create custom character packs.

http://www.screenr.com/K3m8

First eLearning eLements Post

cartoon image of a questioning faceSo, I guess I should get it out of the way: I’m a novice blogger, and a reluctant one at that. Not that I don’t enjoy writing, but it feels like such a big commitment, and a great responsibility to provide information to readers…well, of course that’s assuming I HAVE readers…on a regular basis. So I pondered whether to do this for quite some time.

But, I’ve been encouraged to share what I know, and what I’m learning, about eLearning. And I’m using the term eLearning pretty broadly, because it can encompass so many things: instructional design, graphic design, technical writing, needs analysis, screencasting, script writing, narration, video creation…to name a few eLearning eLements.

More next time.